Bulletins & Calendar

Calendar of Events

Bulletin of Events

Simcoe Days 2019

Fenelon Falls , Ontario. August 3 2019 11am-8pm

 

This years Simcoe days will be representing the “UN Year of Indigenous Languages” and the many settlers to Upper Canada.

The Legion tables will displaying information about Samuel de Champlain. How he traveled up through the Trent Severn Water Ways, the tools he used and people he came across during his adventures. Come drop by our table for more information and a chat with our volunteers. There will be a dress-up trunk for the kids. (Parents are welcomed to take photos). Free treats for the kids ,fill out a ballot for prize give a-ways. Donations to the artifacts department of the Legion most welcomed. A shuttle bus will be provided from the parking lot located off Helen Street.

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Bar & Outside Deck

Our Bar

Summer is now here! Why not come out and relax on our back deck. while enjoying the view of the Lindsay Locks, With a cool summer breeze and a refreshing beverage from the Bar. Order a lunch special (lunch specials located on our calendar of events). Meet some of the Veterans from local branch, hear their stories. Guarantied you will walk away with a smile.

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Kitchen

Kitchen Staff & Volunteers


  Why not drop by for a delicious, sandwich or lunch special.In our downstairs lounge (found on our calendar of events). We have a dedicated crew of staff and volunteers, geared to make your a meal a memorable one. They are also the ladies and gentlemen that help make your event a meaningful experience when renting one of our rooms for that special event.

From left to right: Joanne Pritchard , Judy Eyers, Malene Bartley, Edith Baker, Cindi Buda, Mike Hansman, Lynne Alexopoulos,Bev Johnston


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The Royal Canadian Legion Branch 67 is embarking on our public outreach program

Legion is excited to offer Central Senior Public School a field trip to Fort York in Toronto with a small group of Veterans on 21 May 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vimy Dinner April 9 2019

This is the 102nd anniversity of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. The battle said to have shaped this nation.

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Branch 67 Annual Meeting & Branch Elections Sunday 14th April 2:00pm

We will post all of your Branch Executive and their postions for 2019 by the end of June


 

 

 

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Ladies Auxiliary Bake Sale

Tarts, Squares, Cookies the works will be there. Buy your favourate cakes.


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Important notice Branch 67 Ladies Auxiliary Elections Tuesday 7th May 5:30pm

Come out and support your Ladies Auxiliary Branch 67 Elections

Officers and committee`s will be posted after the election.

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Annual Public Speaking Competition

Branch Youth Education officer Jim McKenzie running an annual Public Speaking Competition. Sunday 24th February 2019. Come out and support this great event.

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Our Student Catherine Cadigan Recognized at the Legion

Catherine has been a great resource for the Legion. Helping with numerious projects for the Artifacts Committee.

We have been trying for a few months to track down this very busy young lady. To present her with a Legion Certificate of Appreciation for all of her hard work while here on a co-op assignment.  We hope to have her help out again when she is available.  A avid historian herself. She was a great addition to the research and artifact groups of the Legion.  We wish her all the best in her future endeavors.  Great Job, Bravo Zulu.

From left to right in photo:  Howie Johnston, Catherine Cadigan, Claus Reuter, & Bill Neville.

 

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Seasonal Sharing Basket with the Veterans

At Canadian Forces Base Borden,

The Lindsay Legion donating $2000.00 towards the Seasonal Sharing Basket to Veterans at Canadian Forces Base Borden.  

Once again the Lindsay Legion helping Canadian Armed Forces Veterans in this festive season.

 

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Card / Letter to a Canadian Armed Forces Member overseas and not at home for Christmas holidays.

This is two address for CAF members you are wishing to send a Letter or a Holiday Card to.

The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) web site will show the actual deployment address through Canada Post.

Any Canadian Forces member PO Box 5140 Stn Forces Belleville Ontario K8N5W6

Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) web site.  http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/write-to-the-troops/mailing-instructions.page#anc3

 

 

 

 

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Remembrance Honours & Awards Dinner

Come out & have a great evening honouring our Veterans & Legion members

Our Special Events Chair Comrade Rob McDougall would like to thanks all who helped out with the Honours and Awards Dinner. Congratulations to all the recipients. Especially Comrade Claus Reuter for receiving the Legionnaire of the Year Award.

 

Claus Reuter receiving the Legionnaire of the Year award

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Poppy Campaign

Our Poppy campaign has been another successful event for this year for our legion

Will be starting on the 29th October until 10th November 2018. Come out and help/sign up with our Poppy Drive before Remembrance Day on November 11th.

Contributions received from the Poppy campaign directly support Veterans and their families, and ensure Canada never forgets.

Promoting Remembrance is part of The Royal Canadian Legion’s mission and has been one of our principal objectives since our inception. The Legion inspires Canadians to remember those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country, and to honour those who served and continue to serve today. Remembrance is a year-long commitment and we endeavour to promote it through a number of programs, services and resources.

Poppy Trust Funds
Your contributions directly support Canada’s Veterans and their families, while ensuring Canada never forgets.

Use of Poppy Trust Funds

Through your donations to the Legion Poppy Fund, the Legion provides financial assistance and support to Veterans, including Canadian Armed Forces and RCMP, and their families who are in need. Poppy Funds may be used for:

Grants for food, heating costs, clothing, prescription medication, medical appliances and equipment, essential home repairs and emergency shelter or assistance for Veterans and their families in need

Housing accommodation and care facilities for Veterans
Funding for Veteran Transition Programs that are directly related to the training, education and support needs of Veterans and their families
Comforts for Veterans and their surviving spouses who are hospitalized and in need
Veterans visits, transportation, reading programs and day trips
Accessibility modifications to assist Veterans with disabilities
Educational bursaries for children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of Veterans
Support of cadet units
Community drop-in centres, meals-on-wheels, and seniors services in communities where Veterans would benefit
Community medical appliances, medical training and medical research which will assist in the care of Veterans in the community
Support the work of Legion Command and Branch Service Officers across Canada in assisting and representing Veterans
Donations for relief of disasters declared by federal or provincial governments which impact Veteran in those communities
Promotion and administering of Remembrance activities to ensure Canadians never forget the sacrifices of Canada’s Veterans


Poppy Trust Fund Administration

The Poppy Campaign is organized and run by local Legion volunteers at over 1400 branches across Canada and abroad. Poppy Funds are held in trust at every level of the Legion and the use of these trust funds are strictly controlled, with appropriate approval processes. Branch executives are accountable for Poppy Fund expenditures and are required to inform the public through local media of the results of their campaign, including contributions received and disposition of funds. You may contact your local Legion branch to request information on their Poppy Campaign.

Details on the Poppy Trust Fund can be found in the Legion`s Poppy Manual.

Supporting Veterans Every Day

Thank you for your donations to the Poppy Fund. Through your generosity, the Legion helps all of Canada’s Veterans.

Did you know you can support Veterans year-round by becoming a member of the Legion? Join today!

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Remembrance Day Service 11hour, 11day, 11 month

Rob McDougall our veteran and Master of Ceremonies on Remembrance Day

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Kent Street Tattoo

The Lindsay Legion would like to thank the Kent Street Tattoo for another sucessful fund raiser on Remembrance Day November 11th


Kent Street Tattoo here in Lindsay has had another Remembrance Day Fundraiser for the Poppy Fund. 

All of their proceeds form tattooing a Poppy/Poppies for their customers goes to the Lindsay Legion Poppy Fund. They worked all day for the Poppy Fund which goes to the support of Veterans and their Families. Their total for the day was $2115 which brings our overall total for the last 4 years to $8065.

Kent street Tattoo has been in business for 5 years.

The Lindsay Legion thanks everyone who came out and got tattooed or bought a t-shirt.

A special thanks going to the Tattoo Artists:

                                            Corrie Worden

                                            Ryan Worden

                                           Ainsley Worsley

 

 

 

 

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Veterans Project

Our Veterans - proudly past and present.

 

Gordon Gibbins, Joined the Royal Canadian Navy in 1941 at age 17. Trained as a Anti-Submarine Detection Investigation Committee ASDIC (Pinger) or better known as Sonar Operator in later ships. Sailed on HMCS Sans Peur, HMCS Kootenay, D-Day support, HMCS Trentonian, in the Battle of the Atlantic. Gord survived the sinking of HMCS Trentonian on 22 February 1945 protecting a convoy in the North Atlantic.

We just heard Gord crossed the bar May 2, 2018. One of a few of our World War II Veterans. He will be sadly missed by all that the Lindsay Legion. We send our condolences to his family.

  

 

Peter Healey, Joined the Royal Air Force in 1943 at age 19. Trained as a pilot/Navigator/Bomb aimer. Peter then re-mustered to be the tail gunner. One of 7 members in a crew. Flew Wellington 2 engine Bomber, B24 Liberator 4 engine Bomber, and the famous Lancaster 4 engine bomber. Peter saw action over Egypt, Palestine, Israel, Italy, and was preparing to go to Japan when the war ended.

 

 

Bill Laidley Joined the Royal Canadian Navy in 1943 at the age of 16 years old. He joined the Lindsay Legion with his father when he was home on leave during the war and he is still a member today. During the war he served on the HMCS St Pierre K680 as a Marine Engineer (stoker) doing convoy escort.

Bill told us this interesting story about his naval experience in World War 2. As the war was winding down his ship was slotted for a convoy escort JW67 heading form Greenock Scotland going to north Russia. As they where proceeding to Russia they where diverted, ordered to rendezvous with and escort German Submarines that had capitulated off the southern coast of Norway and take them back to Scotland under the agreed surrender conditions.

While underway in a fjord in the north of Scotland. Bill had completed his duty watch form the engine room around 2300 (11pm) he headed topside coming out on the 12-pounder gun deck. He noticed that the submarine tied up along side (abreast) of his ship and the conning tower of the captured submarine was at his deck level. Up until that time he had never seen a German Submarine up close. While he was standing there looking at the submarine, the captain of the submarine came up onto the coning tower and Bill said to the captain “how are you tonight sir” to his absolute surprise in perfect English the captain said “I’m fine how are you” Bill then said to the captain “ you can speak good English” The captain then replied “ He had studied in McGill university in Montréal and was a helmsman on the Taddy Shack ship during the summer months and just before war broke out he headed back to Germany with all of the charts of the St Lawrence river and seaway”. The conversation ended abruptly as someone came up to the conning tower from below.  At the time he said he had never heard of Pierre Trudeau and wondered if he was sympathetic to the Nazi’s cause?

 

 

Douglas Louch, Joined Royal Canadian Navy April 1949.  Was trained as a Communications Operator (Com Ops) Served on HMCS LaHulloise (frigate), HMCS Crescent (destroyer), HMCS Prestoian (frigate), HMCS Chignecto, (Minesweeper). HMCS Iroquois destined for the Korean War. On an operation near Songjin, North Korea, took on enemy fire killing 3 and wounding 10. This was the only casualties to the RCN for the Korean War. Reenlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force 1954 as a Radio Operator. Many postings. Retired form the CAF in December 1975. Lastly Joined the Canadian Coast Guard.

 

 

John Danilko, enlisted in the Canadian Army, with the Royal Canadian Regiment, 1st Battalion on October 16th 1951 and went through basic training in Petawawa. His 1st Battalion was later changed to the 2nd  Battalion, and then later 3rd  Battalion.  He served in Korea with the "Special Force" involved in engagement with the enemy at Hill 355, and then onto guarding POW`s a Kojedo Island. He served in Germany with NATO Force. John received his honourable discharge on June 7 1955. His medals include the Korea medal, UN service medal (Korea) Special Medal NATO, UN Peacekeeping Medal, Volunteer Service Medal (Korea). John currently resides in Lindsay where he is a member of Sir Sam Hughes Branch 67 of the Royal Canadian Legion with 26 years service.

 

 

Philip N Lilly, Joined the Royal Canadian Air Force Police (Military Police) in 1956 until 1966. Philip Lilly, was a teacher, Hospital CEO, and now a snow bird in the winter. Was an active member in the Legions over the years.

 

 

Don Scott, Was in the Royal Canadian Navy as a Marine Engineer (Stoker) He owns a roofing company here in Lindsay.

  

 

Ed Baker, Enlisted in the Army in June 1953. Served with the Royal Canadian Signal Corps with a multitude of different jobs. Honorable discharged in 1956. Ed has been a active member of Sir Sam Hughes Legion Branch 67 and Highland Creek Legion Branch 258 for 35 years.

 

 

Charles Olito, Joined the Royal Air Force in 1948 1956. Trained as a Cpl Wireless Fitter. Three years posted Air Scientific Recovery (Security) Unit, (ASRU) 1954 Wing Commanders Office Selecting (Radio) sites for 1955 exercises. 1955 Exercises and First Mobile Field Trials.  Modern day Telephone System and Electronic Cyphers

  

 

Lieutenant Colonel (LCol) Ron Neal CD (Ret`d) Enrolled in the Lincoln and Welland Regiment as a Private 1964. Served with 2 Battalion Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR) as a reserve call out to Germany in 1967. Commissioned Lieutenant 1971. Graduated Militia Command and Staff Course Kingston Ontario 1989. Commanding Officer of the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment 1990 - 1993. Commanded Toronto District Infantry Battalion, Military Concentration Petawawa 1992. Currently the Secretary Treasurer of the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment Trust Fund.

  

 

Michael Wilkinson born and raised in Lindsay from a proud military family. Joined the Army in 1981. After basic training 12 weeks in Cornwallis moved on to do his TQ3s course for 6 months in Petewawa with 1 Royal Canadian Regiment (1RCR) in London Ontario from 1981-1983. Posted to the Airborne Regiment 3 commando12 platoon also with Van Doos Regiment 1 Commando French Recce Company then on to the Pathfinder unit. Lastly posted to the Scottish Regiment (Kilt) Vancouver Island as an Instructor for new recruits.

 

 

Tom Cook, was born in Toronto, on 14th July 1932.  He enlisted in the Canadian Army on September 14th 1952 serving in Canada and Korea. The Canadian artillery stopped firing high explosive shells at Chinese positions a few minutes before the truce was signed, even though offcially both sides were permitted action until the ceasefire went into effect exactly 12 hours after the truce was signed. The only action by Canadian Gunners was firing of four smoke shells. These last smoke shells where fired by the crew which included Gunner Tomas Cook. Following his honourable discharge on 30th September 1954, Tom joined the Toronto Scottish Regiment Reserves.  He was employed by the city of Toronto for a total of 26 years in the Department of Roads and Traffic before layoff due to government cutbacks. He eventually moved to Kirkfield where he resides with his wife Fran.

   

 

 


 

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HMCS Lindsay

Pulls into dry dock at the Lindsay Legion


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Membership & Dues

Membership dues for 2019 are due now.

Membership

As of February 15th the branch has received 645 renewals which consist of 9 life, 127 ordinary, 380 associates, 138 affiliate and 1 n/v affiliate. As per Dominion Command we are at 99.03%.

Yours in comradeship,

James Cameron Membership Chairman

 

CHANGE OF INFORMATION REQUEST

 

Full Name:…………………………………………………………..

Membership Number:……………………………..

Address:……………………………………………. Province:…………..

Postal Code:…………………        Telephone No.:…………………….

I am interested in volunteer work. I consent to have my number to

Be provided to the volunteer Chairman.      Yes           No

Please advise what volunteer work interest you. Thank you.

 

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St-at-Arms Report

Sergent at Arms needs your help for flag bearers

SGT-AT-ARMS REPORT

Greetings Comrades, pretty soon the nice weather will once again be upon us, and our new marching of colours, for various occasions will be here. I will be posting on the bulletin board as the date of each occasion nears, and any member who has in the past, or recently considered carrying a colour for our colour Party are welcome. Comrades! It is an honour to represent our branch on parade with our Branch Colour Party. Proudly wearing our customary blues and greys…we are upholding a valued tradition of The Royal Canadian Legion.

We are appealing to our membership; to consider becoming part of these traditional events. A recruitment notice will be posted and I hope to see a good response. Thanks to all who have done so in the past.

Yours in comradeship

Dave St. Denis Sgt-at-Arms

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Poem remembering WW2 Veterans

Submitted by Korean Veteran Cal Callebert.


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History of the Poppy

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ​JOHN McCRAE and Poem in Flanders Fields

                     

POPPY HISTORY

​​​​Each November, Poppies blossom on the lapels and collars of over half of Canada’s entire population. Since 1921, the Poppy has stood as a symbol of Remembrance, our visual pledge to never forget all those Canadians who have fallen in war and military operations. The Poppy also stands internationally as a “symbol of collective reminiscence”, as other countries have also adopted its image to honour those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice.

This significance of the Poppy can be traced to international origins.

The association of the Poppy to those who had been killed in war has existed since the Napoleonic Wars in the 19th century, over 110 years before being adopted in Canada. There exists a record from that time of how thickly Poppies grew over the graves of soldiers in the area of Flanders, France. This early connection between the Poppy and battlefield deaths described how fields that were barren before the battles exploded with theblood-red flowers after the fighting ended.

Just prior to the First World War, few Poppies grew in Flanders. During the tremendous bombardments of that war, the chalk soils became rich in lime from rubble, allowing “popaver rhoes” to thrive. When the war ended, the lime was quickly absorbed and the Poppy began to disappear again.

The person who was responsible more than any other for the adoption of the Poppy as a symbol of Remembrance in Canada and the Commonwealth was Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian Medical Officer during the First World War.


​​​​​​LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ​JOHN McCRAE

​​​Lt. Col. John McCrae Lieutenant-Colonel McCrae was born on 30 November 1872 in Guelph, Ontario. At age 14, he joined the Highfield Cadet Corps and, three years later, enlisted in the Militia field battery. While attending the University of Toronto Medical School, he was a member of the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada.

With Britain declaring war on Germany on 4 August 1914, Canada’s involvement was automatic. John McCrae was among the first wave of Canadians who enlisted to serve and he was appointed as brigade surgeon to the First Brigade of the Canadian Forces Artillery.

In April 1915, John McCrae was stationed near Ypres, Belgium, the area traditionally called Flanders. It was there, during the Second Battle of Ypres, that some of the fiercest fighting of the First World War occurred. Working from a dressing station on the banks of the Yser Canal, dressing hundreds of wounded soldiers from wave after wave of relentless enemy attack, he observed how “we are weary in body and wearier in mind. The general impression in my mind is of a nightmare.”

In May, 1915, on the day following the death of fellow soldier Lt Alexis Helmer of Ottawa, John McCrae wrote his now famous work, an expression of his anguish over the loss of his friend and a reflection of his surroundings – wild Poppies growing amid simple wooden crosses marking makeshift graves. These 15 lines, written in 20 minutes, captured an exact description of the sights and sounds of the area around him.

Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae left Ypres with these memorable few lines scrawled on a scrap of paper. His words were a poem which started, “In Flanders fields the poppies blow…” Little did he know then that these 15 lines would become enshrined in the innermost thoughts and hearts of all soldiers who hear them. Through his words, the scarlet Poppy quickly became the symbol for soldiers who died in battle.

The poem was first published on 8 December 1915 in England, appearing in “Punch” magazine.

IN FLANDERS FIELD

​​In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

John McCrae

 

POPPY CHAIRMAN - John Sherman

​As part of your oath to join the Legion you are required to participate in the Poppy Campaign. We need everyone to participate as many times as they can to make this a big success. Don’t let a few people do the work of many. All of the stores are a major source of revenue for us.
All the stores need to be manned as much as possible.100% of the time would be great and we can be achieved this if you volunteer more than once.

Sign up boards will be in place in mid October. Sign up where you can and as often as you can. This money is used for Veterans and so many other uses.
Even if you think you volunteered in the past and you don’t have to again... please reconsider as it is your duty to participate.

Just imagine the impact we could make if every member volunteered even 1 hour of their time to our Poppy Campaign. Come out and meet other members in this worth while endeavour. This is our major fundraiser of the year for the Poppy Fund.
John McCrae poem speaks of Flanders fields, but the subject is universal – the fear of the dead that they will be forgotten, that their death will have been in vain. Remembrance, as symbolized by the Poppy, is our eternal answer which belies that fear.

Sadly, Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae died of pneumonia at Wimereux, France on 28 January 1918. He was 45 years old.

THE FLOWER OF REMEMBRANCE
An American teacher, Moina Michael, while working at the YMCA Overseas War Secretaries’ headquarters in New York City in November 1918, read John McCrae’s poem “In Flanders Fields”. She immediately made “a personal pledge to keep the faith and vowed always to wear a red poppy of Flanders Fields as a sign of remembrance and as an emblem for keeping the faith with all who died".

Two years later, during a 1920 visit to the United States, a French woman, Madame Guerin, learned of the custom. On her return to France, she decided to use handmade Poppies to raise money for the destitute children in war-torn areas of the country. Following the example of Madame Guerin, the Great War Veterans’ Association in Canada (the predecessor of The Royal Canadian Legion) officially adopted the Poppy as its Flower of Remembrance on 5 July 1921.

Thanks to the millions of Canadians who wear the Legion’s lapel Poppy each November, the little red plant has never died. And neither have Canadian’s memories for 117,000 of their countrymen who died in battle


​​​​A SYMBOL OF UNITY

​​​At 0530 hours on the morning of 9 April 1917, the Battle of Vimy Ridge began, marking an important milestone in our military history. For the next few days, Canadian troops fought relentlessly, braving enemy forces, a heavily-fortified ridge and the weather. This battle was significant; not only was it a resounding success for Canada but, in the words of Brigadier-General A.E. Ross, it marked the “birth of a nation”. No longer would Canada be overshadowed by the military strength of her allies.
​This battle had proven Canada’s ability as a formidable force in the theatre of war.

The bravery, discipline and sacrifice that Canadian troops displayed during those few days are now legendary. The battle represented a memorable unification of our personnel resources as troops from all Canadian military divisions, from all parts of Canada and from all walks of life, joined to collectively overcome the powerful enemy at considerable odds. Our troops united to defeat adversity and ​a military threat to the world.

Now, decades later, Canadians stand united in their Remembrance as they recognize and honour the selfless acts of our troops from all wars.
​We realize that it is because of our war veterans that we exist as a ​proud and free nation.

Today, when people from all parts of Canada and from all walks of life join together in their pledge to never forget, they choose to display this collective reminiscence by wearing a Poppy. They stand united as Canadians sharing a common history of sacrifice and commitment.

lindsaylegion.com   Our Legion Website

https://www.facebook.com/lindsaylegionbranch67/ 

Facebook page

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Local Business receives the Poppy Appreciation Award

St Dave`s Dinner receives recognition for their work for the Poppy Campaign

Owner of Local Business receives Poppy Appreciation Award for their work assisting the Legion Poppy Campaign.

St Dave`s has been a great supporter of the Lindsay Legion and has been recognized by the Poppy Chairman Comrade John Sherman below and owner Dave.

We caught Dave off guard with this presentation. Many thanks to him and his staff for their great support.

Dave`s Dinner has historically always bought all Veterans breakfast if they showed up at his restaurant in uniform on November 11 morning before the Remembrance Day Service.

The Legion thanks you and your staff for your support by this small token of their appreciation. Bravo Zulu!!!

 

 

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We have a celebrity in our mist.

Howie Johnston, made these two videos in recognition of our veterans. "That`s our Legion President"!!! Ladies and Gentlemen

 

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SERVING OUR VETERANS

Of Sir Sam Hughes Branch 67 Royal Canadian Legion
The Last Post Fund’s primary mandate is to deliver the Veterans Affairs Canada Funeral and Burial Program which provides funeral, burial and grave marking benefits for eligible Canadian and Allied Veterans. Its mission is to ensure that no Veteran is denied a dignified funeral and burial, as well as a military gravestone, due to insufficient funds at time of death.
In addition to delivering the Funeral and Burial Program, the Last Post Fund supports other initiatives designed to honour the memory of Canadian and Allied Veterans. It owns and manages its own military cemetery, the National Field of Honour. Moreover, the Last Post Fund has created the Unmarked Grave Program which is meant to provide military markers for unmarked Veterans’ graves.
Another option available to Veterans is interment in the National Military Cemetery in Ottawa. One immediate family member may also be interred in the same plot. Please consult this link for further information or telephone 1-800-883-6094 or 1-866-990-9530.
The Last Post Fund is supported financially by Veterans Affairs Canada and by private donations. They can be contacted at 1-800-465-7113 or info@lastpost.ca.
 

The Legion Service Bureau Network serves Veterans, members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), RCMP, and their families by representing their interests with Veterans Affairs Canada and the Veterans Review and Appeal Board for disability benefits under the Pension Act or the New Veterans Charter. The Legion’s professional Command Service Officers are mandated by legislation to provide representation, advocacy and financial assistance free of charge, Legion member or not. 7000+ affordable housing units owned by the Legion for Veterans and their families.

OVERVIEW

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Increase in Benefits from Veterans Affairs Canada

Important information for our Veterans ( Please read )

 Veterans receiving benefits from Veterans Affairs Canada can receive this increase they are entitled to.

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